Use of haldol

Despite their use of prophylactic antiemetic therapies, cancer patients continue to consider chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) to be a significant problem. Patients frequently use various "breakthrough" medications for these symptoms. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of trials regarding treatment of breakthrough CINV. This study investigated the efficacy of "ABH," a topical gel containing lorazepam (Ativan), diphenhydramine (Benadryl), and haloperidol (Haldol), in reducing breakthrough CINV. Adults receiving standard recommended prophylactic antiemetics as outpatients were instructed to use mL of the gel topically when they experienced significant CINV. Patients then were contacted retrospectively to respond to a questionnaire rating their nausea and/or vomiting and their response to ABH-gel treatment. The results were collected during two trials: Trial I began in April 2003, and Trial II began in March 2006. During Trial I, 23 patients were evaluated; 17 patients (74%) reported that use of the gel decreased their CINV, with 15 (70%) reporting relief within 30 minutes of its application. Three patients believed that the gel caused sedation; no troubles with skin irritation or muscle spasms were reported. In Trial II, all 10 patients believed that the treatment was effective. When the severity of CINV was quantified on a scale of 0-10, the mean CINV score decreased significantly from a before gel application to a as evaluated 30 minutes following gel application (P < ). Topical use of ABH gel appears to be a promising and safe rescue therapy for breakthrough CINV that occurs despite prophylactic antiemetic therapy. These results warrant further confirmation in a large, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

The intravenous route is not FDA approved and is generally not recommended except when no other alternatives are available. Intravenous administration appears to be associated with a higher risk of QT prolongation and torsade de pointes (TdP) than other forms of administration. The manufacturer recommends ECG monitoring for QT prolongation and arrhythmias if IV administration is required. A dose in the range of 1 to 5 mg IV has been suggested, with the dose being repeated at 30 to 60 minute intervals, if needed. A maximum IV dose has not been established. The lowest effective dose should be used in conjunction with conversion to oral therapy as soon as possible.

Haloperidol is a typical butyrophenone type antipsychotic that exhibits high affinity dopamine D 2 receptor antagonism and slow receptor dissociation kinetics. [41] It has effects similar to the phenothiazines . [17] The drug binds preferentially to D 2 and α 1 receptors at low dose (ED 50 = and  mg/kg, respectively), and 5-HT 2 receptors at a higher dose (ED 50 =  mg/kg). Given that antagonism of D 2 receptors is more beneficial on the positive symptoms of schizophrenia and antagonism of 5-HT 2 receptors on the negative symptoms, this characteristic underlies haloperidol's greater effect on delusions, hallucinations and other manifestations of psychosis. [42] Haloperidol's negligible affinity for histamine H 1 receptors and muscarinic M 1 acetylcholine receptors yields an antipsychotic with a lower incidence of sedation, weight gain, and orthostatic hypotension though having higher rates of treatment emergent extrapyramidal symptoms .

CNS depression potentiated with alcohol, other CNS depressants. Possible neurotoxicity with lithium: monitor, discontinue if occurs. Caution with drugs that prolong the QT interval (eg, ketoconazole, paroxetine). May be potentiated by CYP3A4 or CYP2D6 inhibitors/substrates (eg, itraconazole, nefazodone, buspirone, venlafaxine, alprazolam, fluvoxamine, quinidine, fluoxetine, sertraline, chlorpromazine, promethazine. May be antagonized by CYP3A4 inducers (eg, rifampin, carbamazepine); monitor and adjust doses. May increase intraocular pressure with anticholinergics, antiparkinson agents. Monitor anticoagulants.

Use of haldol

use of haldol

CNS depression potentiated with alcohol, other CNS depressants. Possible neurotoxicity with lithium: monitor, discontinue if occurs. Caution with drugs that prolong the QT interval (eg, ketoconazole, paroxetine). May be potentiated by CYP3A4 or CYP2D6 inhibitors/substrates (eg, itraconazole, nefazodone, buspirone, venlafaxine, alprazolam, fluvoxamine, quinidine, fluoxetine, sertraline, chlorpromazine, promethazine. May be antagonized by CYP3A4 inducers (eg, rifampin, carbamazepine); monitor and adjust doses. May increase intraocular pressure with anticholinergics, antiparkinson agents. Monitor anticoagulants.

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